: Tracey Sunflower / Eugene, Cascades & Coast

Cottagecore Getaways in Oregon

Swoon-worthy Oregon cottage escapes to feed your Instagram feed
March 23, 2021 (Updated September 1, 2021)

Editor’s note: Face coverings (ages 5 and up) are required at all indoor and outdoor public spaces statewide, regardless of vaccination status. Learn more here. It’s also wildfire season — plan ahead and do your part to prevent wildfires.

Lace doilies underneath a china teacup, knitting by the fire, reading beside a window overlooking a pastoral landscape: Cottagecore is a movement that idolizes the simplicity of time gone by. Popularized on social media during the stay-at-home times of 2020, this swoon-worthy aesthetic has garnered a loyal following for its magnetic escapism appeal. All across Oregon are quiet lodges, cabins and cottages that might make you feel as though you’ve walked into the pages of Little Women or onto the set of The Secret Garden. Slip into a nostalgic retreat at one of these four cottagecore getaways.

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A modest cabin peeks from behind a tree.
Antone Creek Lodge is a lodging partner of Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort, providing vouchers with preferential access and discounts. (Photo courtesy of Antone Creek Lodge)

Antone Creek Lodge

Remote Respite in Eastern Oregon

One important cottagecore consideration is finding rustic lodging that lets you remove yourself from society, including pings from emails and social media happenings. Antone Creek Lodge — about 4.5 hours east of Portland — offers five small cabins you can rent for a perfect head-clearing getaway in the Elkhorn Mountains. Though it does have Wi-Fi service, the setup is ideal for an immersive experience in the forest, with a pristine creek running nearby and deer strolling around the property. While there is a kitchenette in each of the cabins, you can cook your meals over the fire. Fuel up on supplies in either La Grande, about 30 miles west, or Baker City, about 30 miles east. Just 9 miles from the lodge, Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort offers year-round fun at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Visit during ski season (December through early April) for less-crowded trails, or during summertime for hiking, biking, fishing and other lake activities at Anthony Lake Campground (July through September). Summer and fall, find some of the state’s most enchanting landscapes along the Elkhorn Scenic Byway

Inside the Westfir Lodge is a cozy yet hip aesthetic.
Westfir Lodge is nestled in the Willamette National Forest next to the historic Office Covered Bridge and Willamette River. (Photo by Tracey Sunflower / Eugene, Cascades & Coast)

Westfir Lodge & Mountain Market

Adventure Retreat in the Willamette Valley

Situated on the edge of the no-stoplight town of Westfir, a town near Oakridge, the Westfir Lodge & Mountain Market is a quaint lodge built in 1925 brimming with flowery wallpaper and intricately carved wooden decor. Visitors are just a stone’s throw from the North Fork River and the Office Bridge, a covered bridge built in 1945 — two settings primed for photos that don’t need sepia-tone filters. The lodge is a great launch point for hiking in the Cascade Mountains, with on-site rentals for outdoor gear and on-the-go food. When you take a break from knitting, you can also explore the world-renowned mountain-bike trails. Across the bridge is the Alpine Trail, 15 miles of singletrack winding through the Willamette National Forest. Shuttles and tours depart from the lodge’s Mountain Market, which sells artwork, artisan crafts, food, beer and wine. Don’t miss the housemade pierogies. Experience the thrill of the forest trails with a guided, shuttle-assisted tour from Cog Wild, which picks up participants at the local rental shop, Willamette Mountain Mercantile

Porcelain bathroom fixtures are set in front of a brick wall and navy-blue accents.
Jacksonville Inn is a 1861 hotel in the heart of a historic town and a stone's throw from Rogue Valley wine country. (Photo courtesy of Jacksonville Inn)

Jacksonville Inn

Victorian Romance in Southern Oregon

A cottagecore getaway goes perfectly with some wine tasting in the vineyards. In Southern Oregon’s Applegate Valley, Jacksonville Inn is a historic 1861 hotel decorated with exquisite and authentic antiques. Get ready for gush-worthy details like exposed brick, in-room fireplaces and lace canopy draped atop a four-poster bed made up with ruffled pillows. You’ll feel like you’ve stepped back in time and will also learn a bit about local history — the inn’s eight rooms and four cottages are all named after famous Jacksonville residents. This one-of-a-kind bed and breakfast is a short drive to dozens of nearby wine-tasting rooms with views of gently rolling green hills. Show your love to Rogue Valley’s winemakers along the self-guided Bear Creek Wine Trail, which includes more than a dozen tasting rooms with scenic outdoor patios in the Jacksonville, Medford, Phoenix, Talent and Ashland areas. 

A single cabin sits behind ferns and trees.
Tucked into a coastal forest, WildSpring Guest Habitat is surrounded by mossy trees and salty ocean breezes. (Photo by Blayden Thompson)

WildSpring Guest Habitat

Mindful Rejuvenation on the Coast

The five secluded cabins at WildSpring Guest Habitat on Oregon’s Southern Coast are designed with nature therapy in mind. You may feel as if you’re staying on an estate rather than at a hotel, as they are set in a residential forest with sunlight streaking through 100-foot trees. You’ll find hammocks for lounging and a labyrinth in the forest to encourage you to move slowly through the landscape. Each of the cabins is outfitted with plush rugs, vintage furniture and chandeliers, as well as games and jigsaw puzzles for screen-free fun. The largest cabin includes a wood-burning stove, perfect for curling up and keeping cozy during a storm. The property is on the inland side of Highway 101, making it just a short walk to reach the beach at Port Orford’s Battle Rock Wayside Park, where you can hunt for agates or enjoy a sunset picnic. When you’re hungry, find a bounty of fresh-food options and hands-on experiences along the Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail. 

About The
Author

Emily Gillespie
Emily Gillespie is a travel writer whose work has appeared in the Washington Post, CNN Travel and Afar magazine. She’s lived in three of Oregon’s seven regions, currently calling Portland home. She and her husband look for every opportunity to hike to a view, bike through wine country and eat their way through a new city.