Pacific Crest Trail Hikes

May 30, 2014 (Updated May 3, 2015)
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At the opening of the book “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail,” Cheryl Strayed writes, “The Pacific Crest Trail wasn’t a world to me then. It was an idea, vague and outlandish, full of promise and mystery.” Luckily you don’t have to hike all 2,663 miles of the PCT from Mexico to Canada to find that promise and mystery. In Oregon, the Pacific Crest Trail passes natural wonders like Crater Lake, the Three Sisters Mountains and Mt. Hood before ending in the town of Cascade Locks at the Bridge of the Gods. Get a taste of the Oregon portion of the PCT this summer with a day hike.

Cascade Locks: Enjoy a moderate, 4.4-mile round trip hike from the parking lot near the Bridge of the Gods up to Dry Creek Falls. The trail goes through lush forest to arrive at the base of the 75-foot waterfall. Lengthen the hike by continuing on another 1.6 miles to see the interesting basalt pinnacles between Dry Creek and Herman Creek.

Timberline Lodge: What a great combo — the epic PCT and the lovely, historic lodge constructed at the base of Mt. Hood by the Works Progress Administration. Several hikes leave right from the lodge. Check out the easy 4.4-mile roundtrip hike to Zigzag Canyon, the short but steep 2.2-mile hike to Silcox Hut or the strenuous 12.2-mile loop to Paradise Park and back.

Three Sisters: The PCT traverses the crest of the Cascade Mountains for 40 miles through the Three Sisters Wilderness Area. The challenging terrain offers gorgeous views of Oregon’s volcanoes. Keeners hike the very rugged 20-mile section between McKenzie and Santiam Pass. Out-and-back routes of any length are another option from either of trailhead.

Crater Lake: Thirty-three miles of the PCT pass through the backcountry of Crater Lake National Park. An alternate trail from Rim Village takes hikers to the dramatic rim of the caldera and follows it for 6 miles on the east side of the lake.

About The
Author

Eileen Garvin
Eileen Garvin lives and writes in Hood River. When she’s not hunched over her keyboard or digging in the garden, you can find her mountain biking, kiteboarding, hiking, skiing or camping somewhere in Oregon.