: Yaquina Bay Bridge, Newport

The rich bounty of the seas is one of the biggest draws to the Oregon Coast. Whether you want to forage and fish for your own food, or simply indulge in chef prepared meals, the Central Coast celebrates all that the environment has to offer.

Find your themed route below or download the official brochure.

Person shopping with woven basket at a farmers market.
Photo by Justin Myers

Farm & Forest

Lincoln City to Yachats

U-pick your pathway to fruits and brews.

Start your day at Salt in Lincoln City to grab a house-made quiche and espresso and admire the wares of local artists on display. Continue your visual tour to the Lincoln City Cultural Center, where you can also take classes. Next drive south towards Siletz Bay, turning to follow the Siletz River into the forested hills.

You’ll find many small family farms tucked away in these woods. Euchre Creek Farm sells seasonal fruit and vegetables and raises beef and lamb on open pastures. Call ahead to inquire about tours and current farm stand offerings. Continue upriver towards the town of Siletz. Just north is Gibson Blueberry Farm, where you can pick berries in the summer. Head south to the waterfront Toledo Farmers Market before finding your next delicious meal in Newport, where the rotating menu of Zach’s Bistro spotlights game meats and organic produce.

Stomachs satisfied, head south over Yaquina Bay Bridge to Wolf Tree Brewery, a nanobrewery famous for its award-wining experimental beer made with Sitka spruce tips. The brewing facility sits on a working cattle ranch outside of town, but the tasting room is conveniently located next to the Wilder Disc Golf Course, mountain bike trails and a dog park.

Mosey southbound again, enjoying the views along Hwy 101 to end your day in Yachats. A journey up Yachats River Road leads to the Seeds of Oregon farm stand, selling seasonal vegetables and ornamental plants, and Forks Farm for fruits, jams, produce and organically grown flowers. Back in town, you can’t miss Yachats Brewing —along with an incredible beer and craft kombucha selection, the menu features locally sourced ingredients, including some foraged from the surrounding forest.

A pile of dungeness crabs.
Photo by Steve Dimock

Coastal Abundance

Yachats to Lincoln City

Activate your culinary adventurer.

Wake up refreshed at Overleaf Lodge and Spa in Yachats, ready to indulge in a homemade breakfast delivered to your room, or pop into town for savory pastries from Bread & Roses Bakery and paninis from Beach Street Kitchen.

Head north on Hwy 101 to Bike Newport, where you can rent a fat-tire bike for a beach cruise or take a yoga class, depending on the season. Hydrate with an organic kombucha or cider on tap before adventuring out. After working off your morning meal, you’ll be hungry for fresh local fare at Local Ocean Seafoods or Clearwater Restaurant, both within view of Yaquina Bay Bridge.

After lunch, pick up a bottle and more at Coast + Vine, specializing in natural wines and sustainable seafood. By now you’ve probably happily slurped an oyster or two. Stop for a stroll on one of the many beaches —Agate, Beverly or Otter Crest —that dot the coastline as you continue north on Hwy 101. Arrive at Depoe Bay, home to the world’s smallest harbor, and taste all the delightful dim sum of Asiatico Asian Kitchen.

It’s a breezy drive to Lincoln City, where the Sustainable Living Center rents out crabbing equipment to help you catch your own dinner. (Be sure to check regulations and purchase permits at MyODFW.com.) You can find everything else to complete your meal at the Lincoln City Farmers & Crafters Market or at Barnacle Bill’s Seafood Market. If you need some inspiration, take a hands-on class or watch a demonstration at the Culinary Center. End the night with a taste of nostalgia at Olde Line Lanes, a retro bowling alley serving comfort food and cocktails.

Aerial view of a seafood smorgasboard, including fresh crab and seafood soup.

Artisan Experiences

Florence to Gleneden Beach

Taste flavors transformed by ocean and forest ingredients.

Your journey begins in Florence, where the Historic Old Town brims with character. Take your time exploring the colorful shops, restaurants, hotels and public art — look for the dancing sea lion sculptures. Grab a specialty coffee at River Roasters, then wander the neighboring park’s brick pathways to the scenic Siuslaw River. When your stomach speaks, find your way to the Homegrown Public House, which offers local brews and a menu just for dogs! Or indulge in the creative fusion dishes at Nosh Eatery. Don’t forget to grab a bottle of cranberry rum at the pirate-themed Stillwagon Distillery.

Navigate north on Hwy 101, stopping to admire Heceta Head Lighthouse, one of the world’s most photographed beacons. Make a note that the lightkeeper’s cottage is now an inn and tour the historical culinary garden.

Continue to Waldport, where Pacific Sourdough makes all baked goods from scratch and local ingredients, with 36 hours spent on its naturally leavened sourdough. A glass of wine is soon due north at Flying Dutchman Winery, Oregon’s first “micro-winery” perched high above the Pacific in the town of Otter Rock. Take the scenic Otter Crest Loop Road there, then return to 101 for hiking and bird-watching at Cape Foulweather.

Refuel at Cape Foulweather Coffee in Lincoln City, which offers limited tours of the roasting facility by appointment. From here Salishan Marketplace beckons, where you can find a deli, dessert shops and boutiques all at Salishan Coastal Lodge in Gleneden Beach. At last, relax with a seasonal beer at the stylish taproom of Beachcrest Brewing —you earned it.


More tasty stops

There are 39 stops on the Central Coast Food Trail, from bakeries to restaurants, farms and growers markets, to breweries and distilleries, to seafood stands and indulgent take-home treats. Make your base camp in one of these charming towns and find a delicious farm-to-table meal around the corner. Here are some of the locales to explore.

Lincoln City to Siletz

Newport to Yachats

Florence

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Travel Tips

The Central Coast Food Trail is open to visitors throughout the year and is designed to be explored at your own pace – you are welcome to start and finish wherever you like.

Before setting out, map your route to make it easy to navigate remote areas without cell service and consider calling ahead to inquire at individual businesses about seasonality and hours of operation.

The working farms and fishing charters along this trail provide some of the most unique and engaging experiences. When on a farm, we ask that you respect the invitation to enter each property and be cautious around farm animals and equipment. Children must be supervised at all times and you should be prepared to follow all site-specific rules.

For your safety and comfort, be prepared with appropriate footwear, sun protection and water.

High season varies per business but is typically April-October. If you are out to harvest some ingredients from the wild, please refer to ODFW & the U.S. Forest Service for regulations, permits and tips. Seasonality of key products is listed below:

  • Farmers Markets: Mid-May to October
  • U-Pick Blueberries: July to August
  • Pink Shrimp: April to October
  • Dungeness Crab: December to August
  • Salmon: May to August
  • Halibut: Summer
  • Wild Mushrooms: Fall

Your experience along the Central Coast Food Trail should not end when you leave the area. We encourage you to bring a taste of your journey back home to share with friends and family as a reminder of the bounty available on the Central Oregon Coast.

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