What Reopening Oregon Means for You

May 15, 2020 (Updated July 31, 2020)

Curious about what’s reopening in Oregon? Well, it depends on the county.

Across the state, counties are entering Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the governor’s framework for a phased reopening, pending approval by the Oregon Health Authority. Gov. Kate Brown released Executive Order 20-27, known as “Strong and Safe Oregon Phase II,” which provides further guidance on outdoor recreation and travel.

It is required to wear face coverings while in public, indoor spaces (restaurants, bars, hotels, grocery stores, museums, etc.) and outdoors when physical distancing is not possible; exceptions include children and people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from wearing a face covering. Indoor social gatherings are now limited to maximum of 10 people, which includes dinner parties, birthday parties, graduations and potlucks; however, it does not apply to civic, cultural or faith-based gatherings, venues, restaurants or gyms. 

Effective Friday, July 24:

  • Face coverings are required for age 5 and up
  • Restaurants and bars must close at 10 p.m. statewide, regardless of phase
  • Face coverings are now required when exercising indoors, plus outdoors when you can’t physically distance
  • Capacity limit for restaurants, gyms, venues (e.g. concert halls, movie theaters) is reduced to 100 people indoors, including staff

As of July 17, travel to Bend is discouraged through Labor Day (September 7, 2020) to protect the health of the community.

As public life and businesses begin to reopen, Oregonians and visitors need to make informed decisions and be prepared for the “new normal.” Whether a community is in Phase 1 or Phase 2, it is important to plan ahead, maintain physical distance, and be prepared to wear a face covering. We’re all in this together.

What reopening means for the whole state

Baseline reopening statewide

The term “Baseline” refers to statewide guidelines that include counties not entering Phase 1; you might think of this as Phase 0. Though some Baseline restrictions have eased — allowing zoos, museums and outdoor gardens to reopen — several restrictions remain, such as restaurants open for takeout only.

Outdoor recreation: The governor’s new statewide directive allows for recreation sites to reopen if land managers believe safety measures can be met. Day-use areas are gradually reopening at Oregon State Parks and other sites. Most camping remains closed, including dispersed camping in state forests. This page provides updates about outdoor sites and the protocols visitors should take while recreating.

Retail: Oregon retail stores are allowed to reopen with reduced occupancy to ensure physical distancing, clear signage about COVID-19, frequent sanitation and required face coverings. Additional recommendations are also provided.

Gatherings: Local cultural, civic and faith gatherings are allowed for up to 25 people provided physical distancing can be in place. Local social gatherings over 10 people are prohibited and those under 10 people must use physical distancing.

Read the full details about Baseline reopening on the governor’s website.

Limited County opening criteria - restaurants, bars and wineries; personal care and salons;shopping and malls

Phase 1 reopening

It is required to wear face coverings while in public, indoor spaces (restaurants, bars, hotels, grocery stores, museums, etc.) and outdoors when physical distancing is not possible. Exceptions include children under 5 and people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from wearing a face covering. 

For Phase 1, counties will need to have declining COVID-19 prevalence, a contact tracing system and isolation facilities. Their health region will need to meet the minimum testing regimen and have sufficient health care capacity and personal protective equipment (PPE) supply. Statewide sector guidelines must also be finalized.

Restaurants: In counties that reopen, restaurants and bars will space tables at least six feet apart and require employees to wear face coverings. Additionally, all on-site consumption of food and drinks will end by 10 p.m. For all counties in Oregon, food takeout and delivery are allowed and residents are encouraged to support local businesses.

Gatherings: As part of Phase 1, groups of only up to 25 people will be able to gather together ⁠locally — with no travel. All large gatherings are canceled or significantly modified through at least September 2020.

Read the full details about Phase 1 on the governor’s website.

Phase 2 graphic references sports, venues, pools, work, gatherings and restaurants.

Phase 2 reopening

It is required to wear face coverings while in public, indoor spaces (restaurants, bars, hotels, grocery stores, museums, etc.) and outdoors when physical distancing is not possible. Exceptions include children under 5 and people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from wearing a face covering. 

For Phase 2, counties will need to have completed 21 days in Phase 1 and are succeeding in controlling the spread of the virus. Find specifics about the process here.

Indoor and outdoor entertainment facilitiesOperations are allowed to reopen if activities are limited to parties of 10 people of fewer, physical distancing measures are maintained, and employees wear face coverings and thoroughly sanitize facilities, among other details. Drop-in childcare and contact sports remain prohibited.

Restaurants and bars: Businesses must determine maximum occupancy to maintain physical distancing requirements and enforce them, such as with table spacing, party sizes and sanitation. All on-site consumption of food and drinks must end by 10 p.m. Self-service operations and pre-set tableware are prohibited.

Venues and events: Operators of venues and events are required to assign a physical distancing monitor and limit capacity to a maximum of 250 people, including staff, based on a determination of capacity, among other details.

Gatherings: The gathering size limit is a maximum of 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors, except for venues, restaurants and bars, indoor and outdoor entertainment facilities and fitness-related organizations, which are subject to a determination of capacity at a maximum of 100.

Read the full details about Phase 2 via the Oregon Health Authority.

What this means for visitors

With most counties in Phase 2, and summer in full swing, people have started to venture out. Though, with increased COVID-19 cases, staying local is important — and it is crucial (and required) to wear a face covering in public indoor and outdoor spaces.

It is important for Oregonians and visitors to always plan ahead, be patient and flexible. Call businesses before you visit to make sure they are open. Many attractions and businesses that are reopening are doing so at limited capacity, may have different hours of operation and reservations may be required. Lodging properties may also choose to space out reservations. Make sure you pack a face covering as they are required in all indoor public spaces (restaurants, bars, hotels, grocery stores, museums, etc.). Exceptions include children and people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from wearing a face covering. 

As the state reopens, it’s important to remember the risks. We must all do our best to protect ourselves and others. The state has released general guidelines that the public should follow regardless of where they live or what phase of reopening their community is in:

  • Stay home if you are sick.  
  • Use cloth, paper, or disposable face coverings in all public indoor and outdoor spaces (retail stores, hotels, grocery stores, parks, trailheads, boat ramps, etc.).
  • Practice physical distancing of at least six (6) feet between you and people who you do not live with. 
  • People who are at risk for severe complications (over age 60 or have underlying medical conditions) should stay home even if they feel well. 
  • If you become symptomatic (cough, fever, shortness of breath) while in public, please return home and self-isolate immediately.
  • Practice good hand hygiene with frequent handwashing for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer (60-95% alcohol content).
  • Cover coughs/sneezes with elbow or tissue. If you use a tissue, immediately discard tissue in garbage and wash your hands.
  • Avoid touching your face.  

As you venture out, please be considerate of the places you are visiting. Have patience with businesses as they are also getting used to these new guidelines. Call ahead or visit a business profile online ensure they are open and to learn what guidelines they are asking visitors to follow. Be flexible, if there’s a crowd at a place you want to visit, you may need to move on to plan B. Stay six feet from other groups and wear a face covering. We are all excited that we have the opportunity to slowly begin traveling again but it’s important to be thoughtful so the state can continue to move forward through the reopening process.

Review the reopening guidance for the public to help restart public life while maintaining healthy Oregon communities.

Advertisements

Oregon counties reopening

The majority of counties in Oregon are now in Phase 2 with exception of the Portland metro region and Lincoln county. Currently, Umatilla County is the only county in Baseline status. Officials will continue to review applications as well as monitor the progress of reopening counties. 

As of July 24, it is required to wear face coverings while in public, indoor spaces (restaurants, bars, hotels, grocery stores, museums, etc.). Exceptions include children under 5 and people with medical conditions or disabilities that prevent them from wearing a face covering. Face coverings are also required when exercising indoors and outdoors when you can’t physically distance. Restaurants and bars must close at 10 p.m. statewide, regardless of phase. Capacity limit for restaurants, gyms, venues (e.g. concert halls, movie theaters) is reduced to 100 people indoors, including staff.

Status of counties' reopening in Oregon (COVID-19)

Eastern Oregon

Baker County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Baker City, Greenhorn, Haines, Halfway, Huntington, Richland, Sumpter, Unity

Resources: Baker County website

Gilliam County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Arlington, Condon, Lonerock, Mayville, Rock Creek

Resources: Gilliam County website

Grant County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Canyon City, Dayville Granite, John Day, Kimberly, Long Creek, Monument, Mount Vernon, Prairie City, Seneca

Resources: Grant County website

Harney County

Status: Phase

Cities: Burns, Diamond, Hines, Fields, Frenchglen

Resources: Harney County website

Malheur County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Adrian, Jordan Valley, Nyssa, Ontario, Rome, Vale

Resources: Malheur County website

Morrow County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Boardman, Heppner, Ione, Irrigon, Lexington

Resources: Morrow County website

Sherman County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Biggs Junction, Grass Valley, Moro, Rufus, Wasco

Resources: Sherman County website

Umatilla County

Status: Baseline (Not Open)

Cities: Adams, Athena, Echo, Helix, Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, Pendleton, Pilot Rock, Stanfield, Ukiah, Umatilla, Weston

Resources: Umatilla County website

Union County

Status: Baseline1 (voluntarily return from Phase 2)

Cities: Cove, Elgin, Imbler, Island City, La Grande, North Powder, Summerville, Union

Resources: Union County website

Wallowa County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Enterprise, Joseph, Imnaha, Lostine, Maxville, Minam, Wallowa

Resources: Wallowa County website

Wheeler County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Clarno, Fossil, Mitchell, Spray

Resources: Wheeler County website

Central Oregon

Crook County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Lone Pine, Prineville, Powell Butte

Resources: Crook County website

Deschutes County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Bend, Black Butte Ranch, La Pine, Redmond, Sisters, Sunriver, Terrebonne

Resources: Deschutes County websiteBend businesses offering takeout

Jefferson County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Camp Sherman, Culver, Madras, Metolius, Warm Springs

Resources: Jefferson County website

Wasco County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Antelope, Dufur, Maupin, Mosier, Shaniko, Tygh Valley, The Dalles

Resources: Wasco County website

Mt. Hood & the Gorge

Clackamas County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Barlow, Canby, Estacada, Gladstone, Government Camp, Happy Valley, Johnson City, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, Molalla, Oregon City, Rivergrove, Sandy, Tualatin, West Linn, Wilsonville

Resources: Clackamas County website; Clackamas County map of open businesses

Hood River County

Status: Phase 1 (Phase 2 effective June 19)

Cities: Cascade Locks, Hood River, Odell, Parkdale

Resources: Hood River County website; Hood River businesses offering takeout

Multnomah County

Status: Baseline (Phase 1 effective June 19)

Cities: Corbett, Fairview, Gresham, Maywood Park, Milwaukie, Portland, Troutdale, Wood Village

Resources: Multnomah County website; Columbia River Gorge takeout and delivery

Wasco County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Antelope, Dufur, Maupin, Mosier, Shaniko, Tygh Valley, The Dalles

Resources: Wasco County website; Columbia River Gorge takeout and delivery

Portland Region

Clackamas County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Barlow, Canby, Estacada, Gladstone, Government Camp, Happy Valley, Johnson City, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, Molalla, Oregon City, Rivergrove, Sandy, Tualatin, West Linn, Wilsonville

Resources: Clackamas County website; Clackamas County map of open businesses; Made in Oregon City local shops

Columbia County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Clatskanie, Columbia City, Prescott, Rainier, St. Helens, Scappoose, Vernonia

Resources: Columbia County website

Multnomah County

Status: Baseline (Phase 1 effective June 19)

Cities: Corbett, Fairview, Gresham, Maywood Park, Milwaukie, Portland, Troutdale, Wood Village

Resources: Multnomah County website; PDX 2 Go restaurants offering takeout

Washington County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Aloha, Banks, Beaverton, Bethany, Cornelius, Durham, Forest Grove, Gaston, Hillsboro, King City, Lake Oswego, North Plains, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, Wilsonville

Resources: Washington County website; Tualatin Valley businesses open right now

Oregon Coast

Clatsop County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Arch Cape, Astoria, Cannon Beach, Gearhart, Jewell, Seaside, Warrenton

Resources: Clatsop County website

Coos County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Bandon, Charleston, Coos Bay, Coquille, Lakeside, Myrtle Point, North Bend, Powers

Resources: Coos County website; Reedsport – Winchester Bay to go

Curry County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Agness, Brookings, Gold Beach, Langlois, Port Orford

Resources: Curry County website

Douglas County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Canyonville, Drain, Elkton, Glendale, Glide, Lookingglass, Myrtle Creek, Oakland, Reedsport, Riddle, Roseburg, Scottsburg, Sutherlin, Winston, Yoncalla

Resources: Douglas County website

Lane County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Blue River, Cheshire, Coburg, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dexter, Dunes City, Elmira, Eugene, Florence, Junction City, Lowell, Marcola, Mapleton, McKenzie Bridge, Oakridge, Springfield, Veneta, Vida, Westfir

Resources: Lane County website; support Lane County businesses 

Lincoln County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Agate Beach, Depoe Bay, Lincoln City, Newport, Otis, Otter Rock, Seal Rock, Siletz, Tidewater, Toledo, Waldport, Yachats

Resources: Lincoln County website

Tillamook County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Bay City, Cloverdale, Garibaldi, Manzanita, Nehalem, Neskowin, Netarts, Oceanside, Pacific City, Rockaway Beach, Tillamook, Wheeler

Resources: Tillamook County website

Willamette Valley

Benton County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Adair Village, Albany, Alsea, Corvallis, Monroe, Philomath

Resources: Benton County website; Corvallis businesses open right now

Clackamas County

Status: Phase 1

Cities: Barlow, Canby, Estacada, Gladstone, Government Camp, Happy Valley, Johnson City, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, Molalla, Oregon City, Rivergrove, Sandy, Tualatin, West Linn, Wilsonville

Resources: Clackamas County website; Clackamas County map of open businesses

Lane County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Blue River, Cheshire, Coburg, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Dexter, Dunes City, Elmira, Eugene, Florence, Junction City, Lowell, Marcola, Mapleton, McKenzie Bridge, Oakridge, Springfield, Veneta, Vida, Westfir

Resources: Lane County website; support Lane County businesses 

Linn County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Albany, Brownsville, Crafordsville, Fox Valley, Gates, Halsey, Harrisburg, Idanha, Lebanon, Lyons, Mill City, Millersburg, Peoria, Scio, Shedd, Sodaville, Sweet Home, Tangent, Waterloo

Resources: Linn County website; Albany businesses open right now

Marion County

Status: Phase 1 (Phase 2 effective June 19)

Cities: Aumsville, Aurora, Brooks, Breitenbush, Detroit, Donald, Gates, Gervais, Hubbard, Idanha, Jefferson, Keizer, Mill City, Mt. Angel, St. Paul, Salem, Scotts Mills, Silverton, Stayton, Sublimity, Turner, Woodburn

Resources: Marion County website; Jefferson Delivers

Polk County

Status: Phase 1 (Phase 2 effective June 19)

Cities: Dallas, Falls City, Grand Ronde, Independence, Monmouth, Rickreall, Salem, Willamina

Resources: Polk County website

Yamhill County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Amity, Carlton, Dayton, Dundee, Lafayette, McMinnville, Newberg, Sheridan, Willamina, Yamhill

Resources: Yamhill County website; ways to support McMinnville businesses

Southern Oregon

Douglas County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Canyonville, Drain, Elkton, Glendale, Glide, Lookingglass, Myrtle Creek, Oakland, Reedsport, Riddle, Roseburg, Scottsburg, Sutherlin, Winston, Yoncalla

Resources: Douglas County website

Jackson County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Ashland, Butte Falls, Central Point, Eagle Point, Gold Hill, Jacksonville, Medford, Phoenix, Prospect, Rogue River, Shady Cove, Talent

Resources: Jackson County websiteJacksonville restaurants open for takeout

Josephine County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Cave Junction, Grants Pass, Kerby, Merlin, Wolf Creek

Resources: Josephine County website

Klamath County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Bly, Bonanza, Chiloquin, Klamath Falls, Malin, Merrill

Resources: Klamath County website

Lake County

Status: Phase 2

Cities: Christmas Valley, Lakeview, Paisley, Plush, Fort Rock, Silver Lake

Resources: Lake County website

About The
Author

Trip Ideas