Avett Brothers

The Avett Brothers made mainstream waves with their 2009 major label debut, “I and Love and You,” landing at No. 16 on the Billboard Top 200 while garnering critical acclaim from Rolling Stone, PasteNew York TimesLos Angeles Times, and Time.

Three years later, in 2012, “The Carpenter” hit No. 4 on the Billboard Top 200 and the group appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live! twice in a few months’ time. During their second performance, the Brooklyn Philharmonic joined to pay homage to Brooklyn with "I and Love and You" at Mr. Kimmel’s request.

Their eighth studio album, “Magpie and the Dandelion,” debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard Top 200. They performed on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Late Show with David Letterman, and accompanied Chris Cornell for a Pearl Jam tribute on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. The band also supported The Rolling Stones in Raleigh during 2015’s Zip Code Tour.

In 2016, the group released “True Sadness.” The Rick Rubin-produced album hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Albums Chart, Top Rock Albums Chart, and Digital Albums Chart, and scored two Grammy nominations. That same year the Avett Brothers were inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame,

Joining the Avett Brothers in Bend this summer is Lake Street Dive. After forming in 2004, while all the band members were studying at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Lake Street Dive assiduously built a following through a series of independent album releases, countless club tours, and a few lucky breaks.

 In 2013, producer T Bone Burnett invited them to join a star-studded lineup at a New York City concert where they practically stole the show—and wound up with a deal from Nonesuch Records. The band’s label debut, “Side Pony,” was greeted with raves. Rolling Stone called it “irresistible” and the Boston Globe said, “Side Pony is a confident, expertly played statement from a band that’s been honing its approach for more than a decade, and it clearly shows that Lake Street Dive is ready to make itself known to whatever audiences have yet to succumb to its many charms.”