These maps and directions are for planning purposes only. You may find that construction projects, traffic, or other events may cause road conditions to differ from the map results. For travel options, weather and road conditions, visit tripcheck.com, call 511 (in Oregon only), 800.977.6368 or 503.588.2941.

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This 45-mile detour meanders along the coast mountain range, past quaint farms, spring waterfalls, and historic mines. It’s a pleasant respite from I-5.

Begin near Riddle

Your tour begins at Exit 103, 21 miles south of Roseburg. Follow Cow Creek Road as it passes through Riddle, an old railroad town named after an 1851 pioneer. Riddle is the site of the last nickel mine and smelter that operated in the lower 48; mine sites and tailings are still evident. Gas up here, as there are no services until the end of the Route.

Go for the Gold

As you head west, picturesque farms and ranches give way to deep forests in the Cow Creek Canyon. Shortly after passing Tunnel No. 1 of the historic Oregon and California Railroad, you’ll find a rest stop where you can pan for gold just as miners did nearly 150 years ago. Because gold is heavier than most sediments and gravel in a stream, it and other heavy minerals called “black sands” (including pyrite, magnetite, ilmenite, chromite, and garnet) can be collected in a gold pan when the right panning techniques are used. Purchase a gold pan, take your pan to a place along the stream where the current slows down enough for the gold to settle out, and try your luck! Good spots are the insides of curves of streams, areas where streams have overflowed, and on the downstream sides of boulders or other obstructions in the water. Even if you don’t strike it rich, spring waterfalls and wildflowers mixed with old-growth Douglas-firs provide a backdrop you’ll treasure. In the fall, hardwood leaves turn to bright reds and yellows. Watch for spawning salmon in the creek’s gravel beds.

Back to I-5

As you pass the West Fork of Cow Creek, you’ll come upon two distinctive steel girder bridges. They date back to 1905 and are still in use today, testament to their fine construction. As the road rises beyond Skull Creek Campground, forests are replaced by pastures and orchards. The Route returns to 1-5 at Exit 80, 18 miles north of Grants Pass.

Nearby Scenic Byways

Looking for more Scenic Byways nearby? Here are some suggestions…

  1. Umpqua River Scenic Byway

    • Distance: 66 M / 106 Km
    • Minimum Driving Time: 3-5 Hours
    • Best Time to Drive: Year-round

    The Umpqua River Valley’s riches nurtured generations of traders, loggers and farmers. Its wealth of natural and historical treasures unfold as you wind through the Coast Range to the Pacific.

  2. East Steens Tour Route

    • Distance: 143 M / 230 Km
    • Minimum Driving Time: 4-7 Hours
    • Best Time to Drive: Spring Through Fall

    This 143-mile tour skirts along the eastern escarpment of Steens Mountain and the vast expanses of the Alvord Desert, providing a scenic study in dramatic contrasts.

  3. Charleston to Bandon Tour Route

    • Distance: 41 M / 66 Km
    • Minimum Driving Time: 2-3 Hours
    • Best Time to Drive: Spring Through Fall

    A short spur off the Pacific Coast Scenic Byway, this route showcases a glorious stretch of coastline that includes six state parks, two National Wildlife Refuges, and America’s first National Estuarine Research Reserve.

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Drive safely.

Keep in mind many of the routes listed here travel through remote areas where gas stations are few and far between. And since road and weather conditions can be hazardous, even into summer, we urge you to call 800-977-6368 or check Trip Check before starting out.

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