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What is there to see and do in Grants Pass? Are the roads easily accessible?

Grants Pass is the gateway to the Wild and Scenic section of the Rogue River. As such, it is renowned for its whitewater rafting. For those who prefer to see the river from a motorized craft, there is Hellgate Jetboat Excursions.

Grants Pass also is near Oregon Caves National Monument, the state’s oldest and one of the region’s top attractions. The city’s downtown is popular with antique collectors, and there are lots of wine-tasting opportunities in the nearby Applegate Valley, as well as a Saturday farmers market downtown.

Kids love Wildlife Images in Merlin and the Bear Hotel Artworks Museum. Here are recent stories from the Mail Tribune’s Joy magazine about those attractions: http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20101020/JOY/10200347&cid=sitesearch and http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110921/JOY/109210348&cid=sitesearch

Grants Pass is about 50 miles north of the California border right off Interstate 5. It also can be reached from the Oregon/California coast via state Highway 199, which is the route to Oregon Caves.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on August 30th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

What are some good kid-friendly activities in Roseburg?

Whenever I vacationed as a child in Roseburg, we always went to Wildlife Safari in nearby Winston. This is the ultimate kid-friendly activity around Roseburg. Check out this story from the Mail Tribune newspaper’s Joy magazine about the attraction.

If you still need more to keep the kids busy, there’s also the fish ladder at Winchester Dam on the Umpqua River just north of town for an educational experience that’s also fun.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on August 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

My wife and I will be traveling four days from Bend to the Oregon Caves. What should we do in between?

If Oregon Caves already is on your itinerary and you’re coming from Bend, you shouldn’t miss Oregon’s only national park, Crater Lake. Along with the Caves, it’s this region’s premiere attraction, as noted in this recent story for the Mail Tribune newspaper.

If you’re coming from Bend south, the most logical route is through the Cascades right past Crater Lake on part of the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway. After Crater Lake, stop at the natural bridge area and Mill Creek Falls. If you keep taking the byway from Highway 62 to Highway 234, you’ll pass right by locals’ favorite spot for hiking, the Table Rocks. These mesas are among the region’s
most distinctive geographic and geologic features. This route also takes you past several vineyards with tasting rooms.

There also are several opportunities for world-class whitewater rafting on the Rogue River between Shady Cove and Grants Pass. Lodging along this route is available at Diamond Lake Resort,  Prospect HotelEdgewater Inn in Shady Cove, yurts at the region’s best state park, Valley of the Rogue, as well as numerous options in Grants Pass.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on August 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

We live in Northern CA and are looking to go visit a town in Oregon that has nice scenery, shopping, quaint hotels, things to do but not too long of a driving distance since we are looking at a long weekend away – possibly over Thanksgiving. What do you recommend?

It sounds like the town of Ashland is right up your alley. Just off Interstate 5 and just north of the California border, this town is, arguably the region’s main tourist destination. It boasts a wide variety of restaurants and
accommodations, including boutique hotels and many bed-and-breakfasts, plus the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Cabaret Theater and a vibrant arts scene in a small, walkable downtown area.

The Railroad District is home to numerous galleries, on the other end of town is the Schneider Museum of Art at Southern Oregon University. See the Mail Tribune newspaper’s guide to visual arts and the Shakespeare festival for more information.

The beginning of the holiday season brings the festival of lights, craft fairs and ice-skating in Lithia Park, one of locals’ favorite spots for easy,picturesque hiking. Ashland also a cyclists’ town with mountain biking,
the Bear Creek Greenway and numerous bike shops.

Family-friendly activities abound, but there’s Science Works Hands-On Museum, North Mountain Nature Center and programs at Northwest Nature Shop.

Ashland makes a good home base for exploring Jackson County’s other attractions: Crater Lake (the state’s only national park), Jacksonville, a national historic landmark (also a good town for antiquing), as well as lots of artisan foods, particularly Rogue Creamery and Lillie Belle Farms in Central Point.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on July 26th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

Where is there good berry picking in the Bandon area?

The South Coast is one of the best places to U-pick blueberries, with the prime location being Langlois, just south of Bandon and north of Port Orford. There are a couple of family-run farms just off Highway 101 that mark their location with signs. Look for Jensen’s, which is organic. Berrying usually is at its height in August, and with this year’s cold summer, ripening could be even later.

Various species of blackberries grow all over the southern part of the state, particularly near waterways and will be ripe into September. Black and red huckleberries thrive under fir canopies near the coast. There also are salal berries on the coastal headlands and the more elusive orange-crimson salmonberries.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on July 26th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

I’m coming to Ashland to see the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. I want to check out some breweries, some wineries, some natural wonders…. I’d LOVE some ‘local’ (that is, somewhat off-the-obvious-path) suggestions of things to check out. -Kristin G.

You’re on the right track with plans to partake of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Ashland’s claim to fame. If you haven’t already, see the Mail Tribune newspaper’s guide to the festival for news and reviews.

If you want to take in the region’s primary natural wonders, plan a day to visit Crater Lake, Oregon’s only national park, or Oregon Caves, the state’s first national monument. I always recommend both, but they are several hours’ drive apart. Here’s a recent story from the Mail Tribune to help you decide.

You could spend a couple of days on wineries alone. The Rogue region boasts dozens between Ashland and Medford, known as Bear Creek Boutique Wines. The Applegate Valley has its own “wine trail,” as does the Upper-Rogue region. See the Mail Tribune’s complete guide to wine tasting, as well as local wine coverage by columnist Janet Eastman.

Ashland has a few popular breweries, including Standing Stone and Caldera, but the up-and-comers are in Medford. Check out Southern Oregon Brewing and Walkabout, which is opening its taphouse in July. While you’re in Medford, eat at Downtown Market Co., the town’s No. 1 restaurant on TripAdvisor and one of my personal favorites.

Most of my “locals-only” tips center around food and dining. Ashland is replete with restaurants, particularly around the plaza, but some of the best (and more affordable) dining is removed from the downtown core. I always make a point of eating at Morning Glory for breakfast, Happy Falafel for a fast, inexpensive lunch and a newcomer, called Sauce, for really flavorful, healthy food.

It sounds a little strange, but Ashland Food Co-op in the railroad district does more food-service business than anywhere else in town. It has a salad bar, hot bar and deli that’s fresh, fast and can accommodate any type of diet.

Check out all my Ashland-area dining coverage here.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on July 13th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

We are planning a business trip to Ashland in late July. Could you tell me of interesting sites in that area? Any ideas for day trips? Any wineries?

If you’re planning a trip to Ashland, don’t miss Oregon Shakespeare Festival, arguably the town’s claim to fame. See the Mail Tribune newspaper’s guide to the festival.

A nice day trip from Ashland is Jacksonville, a national historic landmark that hosts the outdoor Britt Music Festival concert series into October. Or go on an artisan-food tasting tour in Central Point, home to Rogue Creamery and Lillie Belle Farms.

You could spend a couple of days on wineries alone. The Rogue region boasts dozens of wineries between Ashland and Medford, known as Bear Creek Boutique Wines. The Applegate Valley has its own “wine trail,” as does the Upper-Rogue region. See the Mail Tribune’s complete guide to wine tasting, as well as local wine coverage by columnist Janet Eastman.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on July 13th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

We’re touring by car from Vancouver, British Columbia and have 3-4 days available to see some of the highlights of Oregon. Are there any quaint and atmopheric towns in Oregon? We’d like to see mountains, lakes and the coast too. Can you suggest any must-see destinations?

I’m not sure how far into Oregon you were planning on driving, but if you’re looking for atmosphere in the southern part of the state, Ashland is the town for you. Surrounded by mountains (Cascades and Siskiyous), its vibe is about as European as you’ll find almost anywhere in Oregon.

Just off Interstate 5 and just north of the California border, Ashland arguably is the region’s main tourist destination. The small, walkable downtown area is full of historical buildings, along with the Railroad District, which is an easy walk of several blocks. Lithia Park is one of locals’
favorite spots for easy, picturesque hiking. Ashland has a wide variety of restaurants and accommodations from bed-and-breakfasts to high-end hotels, plus the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Cabaret Theater and a vibrant arts scene.

Ashland makes a good home base for exploring the region’s other attractions. I couldn’t agree more that Crater Lake is a must. The drive from Ashland to the national park takes about two hours.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on May 15th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

Want to take my wife on a short three day getaway. Would like for her to see a Bald Eagle and have a romantic view of the mountains, ccean, or lake. Any suggestions?

There’s one place that stands above all the other nationwide for viewing bald eagles. That’s the Klamath Basin region of Southern Oregon. While late winter is the prime time to see them, you stand a good chance during other times of the year.  Here is a great story in the Mail Tribune about viewing bald eagles in the region. Contact the folks at Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge for more specifics. As far as inspiring landscapes, the region has plenty of lakes and mountains. The ocean is many hours’ drive away. You could fly to Klamath Falls by way of Portland or San Francisco on United Airlines.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on May 14th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

What’s the best place to golf near Medford? – K.D.

There are two really great public play courses I would recommend you check out. One is Eagle Point Golf Course. This is a Robert Trent Jones design and one of his last pieces of work done in his storied career.  It is not expensive and good pace of play.  They are going through bankruptcy but that in no way is effecting the conditions or quality of play at the course.  The other course is Centennial Golf Club.  This is a John Fought design – very wide open and much like a links styled course in the middle of Medford.  They have a great restaurant attached to the pro shop and the head pro there, Vince Domenzian, will take great care of you.

As part of your planning, visit the Southern Oregon Visitor Association’s website. They can tell you a lot about the Southern Oregon area
including all the golf that is to be played.  And if you pick up the latest Golf Digest May issue, there is a six page story on Oregon Golf and it has a lot of great information.

Answered by Noel Lucky, Ask Oregon Golf Expert on April 20th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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