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Do you have recommendations for an afternoon tasting beer in Portland?

An afternoon doesn’t give you much time, so I’ll limit this list. Were you to be staying longer, this list could grow quite a bit.

Deschutes in downtown Portland (actually the Pearl, but that’s not important) is definitely one of the best places to consider. You may well know Deschutes, but it’s really worth visiting the local location here. They have a small brewery on site, and they have something like 22 taps, most of which serve beers you’ll never see outside the pub. Deschutes has always had, from top to bottom, one of the best taplists in the country. Great variety of styles, all excellent quality. If you’re looking to eat, they do nice food, too.

The other big brewery to consider is Breakside. It is a little bit remote in the city (out to the north of downtown), but no brewery is making better, more interesting beer in Portland. Like Deschutes, they do a lot of different styles, so you’ll definitely find something there of interest no matter what your tastes. But they do specialize in IPAs, and they’re at the forefront of the modern palate (lots of juicy, fruity flavors). They’re one of the most influential breweries in Oregon right now. They also have a great menu.

There are a bunch of other excellent breweries, and you could spend a week trying to go to them all. Other good choices are: Ex Novo (nice selection of different styles), Upright and The Commons (farmhouse beers), Cascade (sours), Hair of the Dog (big, boozy beers), Ecliptic (standard ales, by the original brewer at Deschutes), Hopworks (standard ales), Lucky Lab on Hawthorne (somewhat average standard ales, fantastic location), Occidental and Zoiglhaus (German beer styles), Widmer (huge selection of beers you can’t get elsewhere).

Answered by Jeff Alworth, Ask Oregon Beer Expert on July 22nd, 2016 - Post Your Answer
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Where should two Texan beer connoisseurs visit during their Oregon honeymoon?

Congratulations on the wedding! The McMenamins pubs are definitely worth checking out — they have some of the most interesting properties in the region. (I have my favorites.) Beyond that, there are literally dozens of breweries in Oregon (six dozen, last I counted). Unless you’re planning for a very long honeymoon, you may not be able to see them all. Because we drink so much of our own beer, a lot of it never leaves Oregon, so most of our breweries are considered obscure to people even a state or two away. Here are my recommendations for the most interesting ones in Portland:

  • Breakside. Consistently one of the best, Breakside has a wide range of beers for all tastes and their Northeast Portland pub has great food. Another good brewery, Ex Novo, is just around the corner.
  • Deschutes. Downtown in the Pearl District, Deschutes is possibly the most accomplished brewery in Oregon, and they also have an extensive taplist of beers you won’t find outside that pub — plus great food. (Try the elk burger.) Not far from Deschutes is Pints, which has a German-trained brewer and does great German beer.
  • Cascade Barrel House and The Commons. These two breweries are about five blocks from each other. Cascade is famous for its barrel-aged sours, and even if you don’t like that type of beer, it’s worth having a sample or two. The Commons focuses on farmhouse beers and especially for the non-hopheads, do some of the best ales in town.
  • Culmination. This is a new brewery in the inner Southeast Portland that has exceptional beer — and I bet no one in Texas has ever heard of it.
  • Upright. Located in the Lloyd District, Upright has limited taproom hours, but does wonderful European styles and some barrel-aged specialties.
  • Gigantic is in an industrial part of town, but they make up for it with their amusing “Champagne Lounge,” where you can get a nice range of their beers.
  • Finally, for the ultimate Portland vibe, stop into the Lucky Lab for a pint (go to the Hawthorne location). It is about as Portlandia a place as you can find (and beloved by locals).

 

I think the ones I mentioned will give you a good sense of what Oregon and Portland have to offer, but they are certainly only the tip of the iceberg.

Answered by Jeff Alworth, Ask Oregon Beer Expert on October 16th, 2015 - Post Your Answer
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What outdoorsy things can my dog and I do together in Portland?

October is my favorite month and dogs are my favorite humans — so you’re in good hands.

When I first moved to Portland I picked up this book and it’s changed my life. And my dog’s. But really, most of the trails in and around Portland are dog-friendly as long as your dog remains on a leash. All of the hikes in the Gorge allow dogs (on-leash) and everywhere near Mt. Hood allows dogs — so long as you’re not trying to forge the Elliot Glacier washout. Because that would be dangerous for everyone involved.

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I’m staying in Portland for several days. What are some “don’t miss” places in and around the city?

Portland is surrounded by the beautiful ocean and the mountains, plus there are so many get restaurants and shops in the city that you would surely appreciate staying a few more days to explore the NW.

Here are some suggestions:

Get lost in Powell’s books, the largest new and used bookstore in the world.

Go see the symphony or a concert at the Arlene Schnitzer Hall

Schedule a walking tour to see the Best of Portland, Epicurean Excursion, Flavor Street (food cart tour) or the Chocolate Decadence tour.

Eats:

Best Pizza: Ken’s Artisan Pizza

French: Le Pigoen

Seafood: Woodsman Tavern

Steak: Ox

Brunch: Clyde Commons

Happy Hour: Portland City Grill (best view of the city)

If you rent a car:

Visit one of the 32 wineries near Portland.

The Columbia River Gorge is a great scenic drive only 35 minutes from Portland. Visit Multnomah falls and have dinner at the lodge.

The coast is only a 1.5 hour drive. Cannon Beach has great restaurants and shops.

Answered by Tally Gunstone, Ask Oregon Portland Expert on September 25th, 2015 - Post Your Answer

Where can two teenagers and their mom have an outdoor adventure near Portland?

Oregon is a great place for teenagers (and you!) You definitely won’t need camping stuff, but if you could pack a pair of sturdy shoes to hike in, you might be happy you did! There are plenty of hikes in the area that are just under an hour drive to get to. And there are plenty of places to hike within Portland as well!

My top recommendations:

  1. Angels Rest
  2. Eagle Creek Hike
  3. Multnomah Falls Loop Hike
  4. Tom, Dick and Harry Mountain
  5. Ramona Falls Hike

None of these hikes are too strenuous and you won’t need camping gear for them.

Places to hike in Portland are:

  1. Lower MacLeay Park to Pittock Mansion
  2. Leif Erikson Trailhead
  3. Washington Park Japanese and Rose Gardens
  4. Wildwood Trail through Forrest Park
  5. Mt. Tabor Reservoir Hike

We’ve never been west of the Rockies! What are the cannot-miss spots in Oregon?

I actually grew up in South Dakota so I definitely want you to have an amazing time. And I am absolutely sure you will!

Highway 101 down the Coast is an amazing drive. I’d highly, highly recommend this over taking I-5 South. There are tide pools, the Goonies House, crabbing, local surf spots, delicious seafood shacks, more tide pools, rocky beaches and caves… ahh. You should definitely check out the coast. It’s unlike the sandy beaches of California and is a lot more “wild.”

My favorite coastal spots are:

  1. Astoria, OR
    • Fort Stevens State Park has a really awesome old shipwreck on the beach and a great campground.
  1. Cannon Beach
    • Haystack Rock is a must-see.
  1. Oswald West State Park aka Short Sands Beach
    • If you want to try your hand at surfing, this is the local favorite.
  1. Tillamook
    • Tour the Tillamook Cheese Factory and taste some amazing ice cream.
  1. Newport
    • Visit Seal Rock, the Historic Bayfront District and Nye Beach.
  1. Florence
    • You’ll want to check out the South Jetty, Honeyman State Park and the Oregon Dunes National Recreation area

If you’re heading toward Portland, I recommend:

  1. Angels Rest hike
  2. Eagle Creek hike
  3. Anything in Hood River
  4. Larch Mountain hike
  5. Tom, Dick and Harry Mountain hike
  6. Forrest Park via Wildwood Trail
  7. Mt. Tabor Park
  8. Stumptown coffee
  9. Blue Star Doughnuts
  10. Por Que No?! Taqueria
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What are the most scenic hikes in Portland?

My favorite and most scenic hikes in Portland:

There are tons more but this is a good list to begin with. Just outside of the Portland area near Multnomah Falls is whole other list so let me know if you’d like to know which hikes I’ve done there and in the Mt. Hood area as well.

One of my most interesting hikes or what I call city treks to date is leaving from the Pearl District on foot and trekking up to the Portland Rose Garden area and then over to the Pittock Mansion. Awesome views all around.

Hope this info helps and please let me know if I can help further. I always remind folks to wear really comfy shoes/hiking boots, take jackets etc. and lots of water to drink and some snacks. Happy hiking!

Answered by Debbie Lusk on January 25th, 2014 - Post Your Answer

We have 3 days in Portland and want to see art exhibits, theater and explore the neighborhoods. What do you suggest? -Joanne

I recommend a visit the Portland Art Museum to start!  Portland also has a ballet, opera, and many theater options: http://www.portlandtheatre.com/calendar/index.php

Most of these cultural offerings are in Downtown Portland.  Adjacent is Portland’s Pearl District, a modern artsy neighborhood.  I would also recommend visiting the Mississippi Avenue, Alberta St., Hawthorne Blvd, and Nob Hill neighborhoods.

Answered by Dave Strom on October 24th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

I will be in Eugene for a meeting on Jan 14th and 15th and would like to see some of the Oregon Coast; perhaps on the previous weekend or maybe starting on Jan 10th. What area would be relatively easy to drive to from Eugene or Portland? What kind of weather should I expect? Can you suggest some B&Bs? — Lois

From the coast, the most direct route to Eugene is from Florence on the Oregon Coast via OR 126 (just under 1.5 hours). You didn’t mention where you are traveling from, but it sounds like you may be coming from the north and you could easily spend four days traveling the North and Central coast between Astoria and Florence. Astoria is famous for bed & breakfasts in historical Victorian homes. If you are looking for more ocean beach destinations, I would consider starting in Seaside or Cannon Beach. In Seaside, you may want to try the Gilbert Inn B&B (historic home). In Cannon Beach, consider Song of the Sea B&B (modern home, close to town and beach). Just south of Cannon Beach is the unique French Chateau-like Arch Cape Inn. In the Newport area, you may want to consider the Sylvia Beach Hotel. It’s actually a historic beach hotel, but very B&B like with a literary slant. Rooms are furnished and decorated based on famous authors. Another unique B&B stay would be the Heceta Head Lighthouse B&B, the original lighthouse keepers’ home (near Florence).

Weather is typically mild and rarely below freezing on the coast, so your travel along the coast should not be a problem. You will want to check on pass conditions as you pass through the Coast Range on your way to and from the coast. From the Portland/Longview area, the lowest elevation on the North Oregon Coast is Highway 30 into Astoria (the Washington side of the Columbia is even closer to sea level). Highway 26 is the most direct route to the coast from Portland, but the Coast Range summit is about 1500 feet and is most likely to have mountain travel conditions. The highest point on OR 126 from Florence to Eugene is under 800 feet.

Weather in January is typically cool with highs average in the high 40s and lows in the mid to high 30s. It is one of the wetter months of the year, averaging nine or more inches of rain during the month, so be prepared. Many come to the coast for storm watching this time of year. There can be high winds. The storm tossed seas can be an awesome site.

Hope this helps.

Happy travels!
Gary

Answered by Gary Hayes, Ask Oregon Coast Expert on October 17th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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Ideas for day trips from Portland in September for a family?

For a coast trip, I recommend taking Highway 26 from Portland, and then take the Highway 6 turnoff to Tillamook. In Tillamook visit the Tillamook Cheese Factory! Then proceed up Highway 101 and stop whenever your curiosity is piqued. There are lots of beaches and parks and vistas to check out. Some cute towns along that route are Cannon Beach, Manzanita, Seaside, and Astoria. If your kids are fans of the movie The Goonies, you’ll definitely want to check out the Oregon Film Museum in Astoria.

Returning to Portland, if you’re spent already, just take Highway 30 back. But if you still have time, I recommend taking highway 202 from Astoria past the Jewell Meadows wildlife viewing area – if you’re lucky, you’ll see herds of elk. You can proceed to Highway 26 which will take you back to Portland. You could also do this whole trip in the reverse direction, if you’d prefer.

Answered by Dave Strom on September 11th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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