Ask Oregon Questions & Answers

21 - 30 of 395   Questions & Answers in Oregon
  Topic

What are the playable golf courses along the Oregon Coast and beyond?

You are in a win, win situation exploring Oregon’s many golf offerings.

The Oregon Coast

You are looking at 363 miles from California to Washington and 27 golf courses along the way.  Your Oregon Coast golf experience is all about how much time you have and how much money you want to spend along the way.  The most famous, internationally celebrated golf resort on the course is Bandon Dunes.  It is everything that you have heard and more.  Truly a great test of golf surrounded by the ocean’s beauty and a resort staff that is there to spoil you at every turn.

From the Central Coast you have gems like Sandpines. And farther north from that course is Gearhart Golf Course. It has lots of history and is one of the first courses built along the Oregon Coast.

If you make it to the South Coast, Salmon Run Golf Course is one of those quiet gems……under new ownership, this course has the ocean views and fun zig zag holes crossing repeatedly the Jack River. Very cool.

Greater Portland

Beyond the great food and drink, Portland has several great courses ranging from a variety of price ranges. A must is the famous Pumpkin Ridge. This celebrated public course has hosted the US Open, US Amateur, Champions Tour events during it’s storied history.  It’s walkable and has pure Oregonian feel with tree lined holes and tight greens.  It’s a must and about a 20-minute drive from downtown Portland.

Willamette Valley

Another great course that is more southeast from downtown Portland is Langdon Farms. This public course has great vistas where you can better appreciate the enormity of the Cascade mountains.  It also has a complexity of holes where your tee to green range fluctuates with the hills in the course.

Answered by Noel Lucky, Ask Oregon Golf Expert on February 15th, 2017 - Post Your Answer

Where should we stay for a romantic coastal getaway?

On the North Oregon Coast, Stephanie Inn in Cannon Beach is one of the coast’s most luxurious lodging options. Cannon Beach offers quick access to scenic areas including miles of sandy beach, Oregon’s iconic Haystack Rock and beautiful Ecola State Park. For a runner-up, the views of Cannon Beach and Haystack Rock can’t be beat from Hallmark Resort and Spa.

On the Central Oregon Coast, Overleaf Lodge and Spa is an upscale lodging property overlooking a turbulent section of the oceanfront in Yachats. It is just minutes away from the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area with attractions like Devil’s Churn and Cook’s Chasm with Spouting Horn and Thor’s Well. As a runner-up, the Heceta Head Lighthouse lightkeeper’s cottage is operated as a bed and breakfast just south of Cape Perpetua. The cottage overlooks a beautiful cove and the seven-course breakfast is famous.

On the South Oregon Coast, Sunset Oceanfront Lodging’s Vern Brown Addition offers some of the most stunning view rooms of Bandon’s oceanfront rock formations and beach. The day trip north to Cape Arago is one of the Oregon Coast’s scenic gems with three interconnected State Parks on the cape. A runner-up or alternative would be WildSpring Guest Habitat in Port Orford. The property is in a beautifully wooded setting with small cozy cabins that are richly decorated. You can explore the private grounds with outdoor art in every direction or soak in the ocean view hot tub. Port Orford is a scenic location and it’s easy to explore the stunning South Oregon Coast scenery all the way to the southern border on a day trip or you can venture north to Cape Blanco State Park and Bandon.

Answered by Gary Hayes, Ask Oregon Coast Expert on February 3rd, 2017 - Post Your Answer

What are your favorite Oregon winter adventures?

During winter, there are tons of activities you can do, from skiing or snowboarding, to snowshoeing, hiking and soaking in hot springs! You can camp in the national forests or wilderness areas, or there are some campgrounds open too, depending on where you want to go. There are also some fun places to stay, like a fire lookout or the Tilly Jane A-Frame on Mt. Hood, which would be more rustic and would require reservations in advance. Alternatively, you could book a hotel or vacation rental in one of our mountain towns, like Government Camp, Hood River, Sisters, Bend or Sunriver. We’re having a great winter in Oregon, so if you’re looking for snow, you can find it across the state!

Can you name the best restaurants in Ashland and Medford?

Thanks for your question! Of course, ‘best’ is a subjective term, but I’m happy to give you my personal recommendations for Ashland and Medford restaurants, as a local. There are many we love!

In Ashland, I highly recommend checking out Brickroom for an upscale pub-like atmosphere; their cocktails and appetizers are their strongest suit, so they’re a good happy hour location as well. For a fine dining experience, Amuse gets my vote (it’s down in the Railroad District), and if you want the largest wine selection, Liquid Assets is a cozy wine bar right by the park.

You also can’t go wrong at Lark’s, located in the Ashland Springs Hotel. They’re another excellent cocktail location. For casual fare, check out Flip, a simple but delicious burger and fry place by the park…they’re owned by the same family as Amuse. Martolli’s is another solid causal dining option.

In Medford, our favorite pub and pasta place is Porters, located in an old railroad depot. They have a great happy hour menu with sliders, salads, and the like, and excellent cocktails. Lark’s also has a Medford location now, located in the Inn at the Commons. There are several fun breweries in Medford, including Walkabout and Bricktowne. Here’s a pretty comprehensive list. I also recommend Jasper’s burgers on Highway 99 between Medford and Central Point.

Hope this list gets you started!

Answered by Amy Whitley, Ask Oregon Southern Oregon Expert on January 25th, 2017 - Post Your Answer

What are the public transportation options in the mid-Willamette Valley?

Public transportation to small towns in the Willamette Valley is somewhat sporadic. Some towns have regular bus service, while others have none at all. Here are some of the best resources for public transportation in the Linn/Benton county area:

Linn-Benton Loop: The Linn-Benton loop will connect you from Corvallis to Albany.

Linn Shuttle: From Albany, you can hop on the Linn Shuttle. This will connect you with several small towns east of Albany: Lebanon, Sweet Home and Foster.

Coast to Valley: This bus service connects Corvallis and Albany to small towns on the way to the Coast, like Toledo and Eddyville.

Also from Albany, you can hop on the Amtrak train, Bolt Bus or Greyhound which will take you north to Salem or south to Eugene.

Once in Salem, you can connect with the Salem/Keizer bus system. This will connect you to many small towns such as Mt. Angel, Silverton, Woodburn, Dallas, Independence, Monmouth, Turner, Mill City and Gates.

If you go south to Eugene, you can connect to Lane County Transit, which will connect you to communities like Junction City, Coburg, Cottage Grove and Veneta.

Sadly, some of the small communities in Linn County are not on any public transit lines that I am aware of. Brownsville, Halsey, Harrisburg, and Scio are all difficult to get to without a car — in these cases a Corvallis or Albany-based taxi service might work.

Cascades West Rideshare is probably your best local transportation info resource. They might even be able to match you up with a local carpool or commuter that would allow you to reach some of these smaller communities.

Good luck with your writing research, and enjoy your travels around the mid-valley!

Are most mountainous areas in Oregon, particularly the Cascades, free of snow in June?

That’s a great question. Depending on the amount of snow we get this winter and how warm the spring is, much of the Oregon Cascades can still be under snow in June. It’s the time of year, however, when trails do start to open up and there will definitely be some trails free of snow. Late June is also a perfect time to start looking for wildflowers! The short answer to your question is that the lower elevation trails will be snow-free and the high alpine (say, above 6,000′) will most likely still be under snow. Also, trails on south-facing terrain will be less likely to have snow than trails north-facing terrain that see more shade and cooler temperatures. The Columbia River Gorge will offer some great snow-free hiking during June, and there are some incredible views of waterfalls and mountains to be found on many of those trails. The trails around Mt. Hood will be a little bit more dependent on the pace of the snowmelt.

What Gorge activities do you suggest for seniors?

I think you’ll find plenty to explore here in the Gorge!  Here are some accessible outdoor and indoor activities:

As for outdoor activities:  Drive the Historic Columbia River Highway along the waterfall corridor to see multiple majestic waterfalls directly from the road. These waterfalls are a must-see — especially in January! For a 3- to 4-hour outing (from Hood River or Portland), I suggest using exit 35 off I-84, and then driving west.  You’ll pass Horsetail Falls on your left, which has a parking area and is absolutely worth a stop. Hop back into your car for a short, but beautiful drive to the famous Multnomah Falls.  Then journey on to the Vista House for panoramic Gorge views and a history lesson. However, these are very popular sights and parking is limited, so I recommend you visit early or on a weekday.

To extend your outing or to avoid the crowds, I recommend a short walk around the Starvation Creek Trail area to see three waterfalls in less than a mile of walking! Take Exit 55, which can only be reached on I-84 Eastbound (if driving west, take the Wyeth exit and turn around). You’ll find Starvation Creek Falls just at the trailhead, but if you stroll .5 miles west on the flat, paved path, you’ll find Cabin Creek Falls and Lancaster Falls.  It’s quite the bang for your buck!

One last idea for the outdoors: Walk along Hood River’s waterfront trail to view the mile-wide Columbia River and stop at pFriem Brewery, Solistic Woodfire Cafe, or Camp 1805 Distillery, all of which are locally owned. To access this area, turn north off exit 62.

 

If you’re looking for cozier activities, consider taking a sternwheeler cruise on the Columbia River, poke around the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, brave the winter roads to visit Timberline Lodge, or ease into a gentle flow yoga class at Flow Yoga.

 

Since the Gorge prides itself with an abundance of artists, breweries, wineries and cideries, wandering the small towns and sampling their specialties is always a fine choice.  Gorge locals are quick to boast about their craft beverage industry, so you’ll find a tasting space just about anywhere you go. Explore the quaint downtown of Hood River and you’re sure to stumble into local art or drinks. Or drive around the countryside and visit some local vineyards. Marchesi, Cascade Cliffs, Mt. Hood Winery, WyEast Vineyards,  and Syncline are some favorites, but call ahead because winter hours can be less predictable.

Is it possible to hike the entire Oregon Coast?

You can hike the entire length of the Oregon Coast, but it is not reasonably possible to plan on staying in towns with lodging and restaurants each night. The Oregon Coast Trail (OCT) offers a truly unique way to experience the spectacular views and natural areas along Oregon’s coastline, but it is not actually a single trail that leads from border to border. The trail includes about 40 percent paved roads, including some portions of Highway 101, with the remainder of the trail on the beach, hiking trails and unpaved roads. The actual hiking distance is approximately 425 miles if you do this trek as a thru-hike.

Thru-hiking the trail can involve a lot of planning. Due to many bays, estuaries and headlands, many portions of the trail can only be passed at low tide and others require following alternate (road) routes or arranging boat crossing to get past these areas. Hikes between hotels and restaurants is also a limiting requirement since most of the OCT is designed for overnights within Oregon State Parks.

Depending how far you would like to hike each day and your willingness to leave the trail and hike additionally on roads into nearby towns, you may be able to reasonably do much of the North and Central Coast as you have suggested. There are some stretches of the South Coast that would require hiking in excess of 8 hours per day between towns with lodging.

There are some guide books that describe the OCT and you can find some basic information and maps on the Oregon State Parks website. Here is a link to a blog from an author of one of the guidebooks.

It sounds like you would be better off selecting some portions of the trail that fit your requirements for hotels and restaurants, as well as offer the kind of hiking experience you are after.

Answered by Gary Hayes, Ask Oregon Coast Expert on January 6th, 2017 - Post Your Answer

What Ashland activities do you recommend?

Ashland is our hometown, and we love it! I’m sure you’ll enjoy a visit. Without knowing your interests, I can tell you that we believe the Oregon Shakespeare Festival to be a must-do; this season of high quality plays and performances run nearly year-round and peak in the spring through summer. I recommend seeing at least one play.

Of course, Ashland is also known as a shopping and food scene, so take time to stroll around downtown (all very walkable) and check out the shops and dining venues. I’d be happy to give you specific dining recommendations, but in general, I always recommend Pie + Vine, Caldera Brewing, and Amuse. Lithia Park is located downtown, and is lovely to visit during any time of year. In the winter, an ice skating rink is a centerpiece, and in fall, the changing colors are magnificent. There are hiking trails and single track mountain biking trails connecting the park to a large network of outdoor recreation in the hills above town.What Ashland activities do you recommend?

If you’re wine lovers, the Rogue Valley has several excellent wine trails: I recommend the Applegate Wine Trail and the Upper Rogue Wine Trail. There’s also outdoor recreation just a short drive from town at Hyatt Lake, Howard Prairie Lake, or Lake of the Woods. We also have river rafting on the Rogue. In Ashland, you can book a day trip from Noah’s Rafting, right downtown. I also recommend hiking near Mt. Ashland, where the Pacific Crest Trail can take you right down to Callahan’s Lodge, a wonderful place to stay a few nights. Otherwise, for lodging, I recommend the Ashland Hills Hotel.

Answered by Amy Whitley, Ask Oregon Southern Oregon Expert on December 29th, 2016 - Post Your Answer

Where do you suggest taking out-of-state friends for a wine-tasting lunch near Salem?

Lucky for you, it’s very hard to go wrong with any wineries in the Salem area! Here are a few fun ones:

Brooks Winery

Brooks has a wonderful blend of elegant wines and a welcoming atmosphere. It’s an absolutely gorgeous space with great views of the Cascades and a fun outside area with picnic tables and outdoor games. They even have local beer on tap if there’s someone in your group who likes microbrews more than wine! The only thing they don’t have is a regular food service — they have great cheese plates and they cook up wood-fired pizza on special event days. I would call ahead and check on food availability and perhaps bring a picnic lunch if they will not have food on the day you hope to go.

Ankeny Vineyard

Just south of Salem, Ankeny is a great boutique winery with views out over a local wildlife refuge. They have a cozy tasting room and a beautiful deck that’s great for relaxing with a glass of wine. They even have a friendly winery dog that likes to come say hello to guests. They have delicious custom wood-fired pizza, salads, and desserts available on the weekends.

Willamette Valley Vineyards

Also just south of Salem, Willamette Valley Vineyards is a much more polished and upscale wine tasting experience than the previous two wineries, though still not stuffy or pretentious (you’ll have a hard time finding an Oregon winery that is stuffy or pretentious — they tend to be pretty friendly!). However, they have a large and beautiful facility with views of the Coast Range, and they are also the only winery in the Salem area, and one of the few in Oregon, to offer a full food menu. Their in-house chef makes amazing dishes that are specifically designed to pair with their wines. Definitely worth a visit.

If none of those sound like just what you’re thinking of, visit www.OregonWineCountry.org or www.TravelSalem.com — both of them have lots of information on local wineries and should help you find the perfect spot.

,
Close
Win a Pendleton Blanket

WIN A PENDLETON
CRATER LAKE
BLANKET

Subscribe to the Travel Oregon email newsletter and be entered to win a commemorative Crater Lake Pendleton Blanket.

Click here for terms and conditions.

You're almost there!
Click the link in the email we just sent you to confirm your subscription.

Hmm, something went wrong, please try later.