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161 - 170 of 221   Questions & Answers in Oregon
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My wife and I will be in the Bend area and would like help in locating four top golf courses to play as well as lodging suggestions. We look forward to hearing from you and appreciate your time. – John P.

Depending on your handicap and energy level, you can actually play 36 holes a day in Central Oregon….there is just that much golf to be had. As far as top courses, I would recommend you consider the following:

  1. Crosswater Golf Club located at Sunriver Resort. If you are a resort guest, you can have access to this top quality course and you’ll love it. There are several tee boxes so depending on your level of play, you can make it as challenging as you like.  Crosswater has hosted several NCAA, PGA Tour and USGA amateur events.  The course is reopening after an extensive renovation the end of May so your timing to play the course is perfect.
  2. Brasada Canyons Golf Club at the Brasada Ranch Resort is also a fun course to play. It is located just outside  of the airport area in Powell Butte.  It is a Peter Jacobson design. The best part of playing this course are the views. Really spectacular views that follow you through out the 18 holes of play. Zach Swafford is the head pro and he and his team will take great care of you.
  3. Black Butte Ranch has two classic designed golf courses that in so many ways give you that authentic central Oregon golf experience.  The Ranch is  located in Sisters.  The property has two courses, Big Meadows and Glaze Meadows…… tree lined and small greens.  it may remind you of playing Donald Ross designed courses if you have traveled east to do just that.  Jeff Fought, little brother to PGA Tour winner and course designer, John Fought, is the director of golf.  They are super people there and will take great care of your every golf need.
  4. Pronghorn Golf Club – Nicklaus  course – Pronghorn is a semi-private facility again not too far from the Redmond airport.  The course may be most remembered for its manicured greens and  over sized clubhouse.  This course design is pure Nicklaus…..knowing  his pattern for risk reward temptation in the hole designs.  You will love playing this course for so many reasons including the very friendly staff, the views and the 19th hole patio area.

All four places I have recommended do provide overnight stay accommodations including all the amenities and restaurants. You really can’t loose if you choose to stay at anyone of these properties so depending on how much golf you want to play, you’re in a good spot. Finally, I would invite you to check out the Central Oregon Golf Trail and Visit Central Oregon for more information on courses in the area.

Answered by Noel Lucky, Ask Oregon Golf Expert on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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I am honeymooning in Portland the first week of May. We are staying in Happy Valley, and trying to take in Portland as the locals do. We plan to take in the great outdoors, shop, and eat. How do we make the most of our week there? L.P.

As the date approaches I recommend checking out PDX Pipeline and my site, Dave Knows Portland for Portland area events. The first week of May means you might also be in town during the Cinco De Mayo on Portland’s Waterfront – it’s a big carnival with rides, fireworks, etc.  If the weather’s nice that weekend it may be a particularly good choice of events to attend. Also I recommend visiting Powell’s Bookstore, brewpubs, and the Farmers Market at Portland State University.

Answered by Dave Strom on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

What is the best time of the year to golf?

As far as best timing for golf in Oregon, the summer through early fall is generally reliable. But often the state of Oregon and the Portland area gets a bad wrap about being raining because that is usually the thought associated with the area. That is just not the case. There are many sun filled days through out the year. I particularly love the golf experience in the early fall. The trees with their colors and the smell of nature and its beauty wraps around your mind as you track around the course.  Really a fantastic experience.

One of the most reliable areas to travel for golf with assurance of super weather is Central and Southern Oregon. Central Oregon has over 30 some courses with a wide variety of designs and price points for greens fees. And, it is filled with sunny days.  Southern Oregon too has a super collection of courses and more reliable weather in and around the Medford area.

Answered by Noel Lucky, Ask Oregon Golf Expert on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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We are traveling to Portland and would love to take right off and go on a nature excurion. We are considering Mt. Hood and Mt. St. Helen’s. Can you tell us which you would recommend and why? In both cases, can you recommend a wonderful place to stop for exquisite dining and wining? something we would never find on the East Coast? – Jan M.

Mount Saint Helens is going to be pretty much out of the question. Due to the time you have available, the drive is too lengthy for you to enjoy yourself. Most of the visitor center’s don’t open until May 18th either and the dining options in the area are limited, to say the least.

Mount Hood, however, is maybe an hour and a half from the airport, and you would have plenty of time to explore once you get there. Timberline Lodge is definitely something you won’t get on the East Coast. They feature Northwest cuisine and an extensive wine list including a large number of Oregon wines. In fact, they have the largest wine list in the state. You can’t go wrong there.

If you are looking for something even closer with more time to fit some hiking in, try a drive along the historic highway in the Columbia River Gorge. The Tippy Canoe near Troutdale has the best seafood this side of the coast, a  great wine list and cocktail menu. If the weather is warm and dry, they have a beautiful outdoor dining area featuring stone tables, fire pits, and patio heaters if it’s a little bit chilly.

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My friend and I are planning a motorcycle ride over to the Oregon Coast from Northern Idaho near the end of July. Any roads or towns you would recommend hitting? We would like to spend some time near the ocean and find some good local brews.

There’s a coveted motorcycle route through the Wallowas on the 39 road (Hell’s Canyon Scenic Byway) from Joseph to Halfway—if you have the time. To get to the Wallowas from North Idaho, you’d come through Moscow and Lewiston over highway 82—another epic two-lane roadway—to Enterprise. That’s where you’ll find Terminal Gravity brewpub, one of the first small crafters in the state and home of a great IPA. (I am a huge fan of  their single hop variety double IPAs only available at the brewpub.) If you take the 39 road, you’ll end up on Highway 84 in Baker City, where you’ll find Barley Browns Brewpub. I also recommend a stop in Pendleton at Prodigal Son Brewery. From there you can continue on I-84 and swing through Hood River and the Double Mountain Brewery before high tailing it to the coast.

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We have three kids 5 and under. We want to go on a vacation and check out Oregon, but don’t know where to go? We would love some good ideas. We don’t mind camping, and we like doing things outdoors, but the kids might only last hiking for a couple of days and then be wiped out. – Sharp Family

Wow… you won’t believe the list of family friendly recommendations in the Willamette Valley. Here are some places to check out:

 

Answered by Debbie Lusk, Ask Oregon Portland Expert on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

We’re interested in renting a home on or near the beach in Oregon for a few weeks this summer. We have kids ages 5, 6, and 12 and are looking for a sandy beach, relaxed quiet community with great fishing, biking and playgrounds. What areas do you suggest? – Lauri

In order to enjoy boating and easy docking, you’re going to have to find a place that is not oceanfront, but more like a bay, inland lake or river. I’m picturing a few places like that on the Nehalem River, and on the Nestucca River, both in Tillamook County. I just did a quick search and found a few on Mercer Lake, near Florence. But, I don’t know of any small, non-touristy communities that are also good for biking and playgrounds — those just don’t seem to go together. But I’ll bet the kids will think the beach is a pretty good playground.

Answered by Niki Price on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

We’re taking a roadtrip from California to Oregon. I would like to do the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway and stay there for a few days to really enjoy it. I would like to stay around the area for 3-4 days, to do some rafting, and definitely hiking and see all the waterfalls. If we can also visit some wineries along the way that would be great. – Priscilla N.

I live right on this scenic byway and can attest to its beauty. It’s indeed worth a few days of your time.

This byway is named for two rivers: the Rogue (in my backyard) and the Umpqua. Of the two, the Rogue is regarded more for its rafting. The Medford Mail Tribune readers picked Noah’s River Adventures as their favorite guide service last year in an annual poll.

There are many other companies in Jackson and Josephine counties that operate rafting trips. If you’re driving Highway 1 up from California, you should take Highway 199 into Oregon, and you will pass right by Grants Pass, a major jumping-off point for river trips and the gateway to the Rogue’s Wild and Scenic section.

You’ll want to do your wine tasting early on, as most wineries on the byway are in the Gold Hill/Sams Valley areas. Del Rio is one of the area’s best, just a couple of miles from Gold Hill, where the byway begins. Folin and Cliff Creek cellars and Agate Ridge all are in the Sams Valley area, which surrounds the byway near the Table Rocks. Make sure to stop for a hike on these mesas, locals’ favorite hiking trails.

Finally, Crater Lake Cellars in Shady Cove is one of the last stops on the area’s wine-tasting trail. See the Mail Tribune’s complete guide to wine tasting in the region.

As far as lodging goes, there is a variety, from hotels and country inns to camping. The Edgewater Inn in Shady Cove has reasonably nice accommodations. Between that town and Diamond Lake, Prospect Hotel is about the only lodging.

Additionally, here is a story from the Mail Tribune about a few of the waterfalls on the byway.

Answered by Sarah Lemon on April 19th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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Can you offer a couple of Oregon IPA’s I must try? – Kevin J.

These kinds of questions are always rough to answer, but I’ll give it a shot. The trouble is, IPAs are so variable that opinions invariably vary. But you didn’t ask me to waffle, so here goes.

I personally have three favorites, for different reasons:

  • India Pelican Ale from Pelican. As an all-arounder, it’s hard to beat. Lots of sticky, resinous hopping, but it’s bright and not overly heavy. The hoppy aromas and flavors are intense but not overwhelming.
  • Double Mountain Vaporizer. A recent phenomenon in Oregon has been the “Summer IPA”–an all-pilsner malt, light-bodied IPA that has all kinds of zesty, refreshing hops. Vaporizer is single-hopped with US Challengers, and it is ideal on a hot day. (Draft only.)
  • Fort George Vortex. Sometimes you are looking to be overwhelmed, to have your eyelids pasted back in your skull as a green flame of hop intensity screams down your throat. Vortex is my go-to in those situations.
  • Ninkasi does two nice beers, as well. Total Domination is their lively regular IPA and Maiden the Shade is their summer IPA. Terminal Gravity’s venerable IPA is still amazing. And, if you’re looking to go imperial, I’d suggest Hopworks Ace of Spades or Hair of the Dog Blue Dot.

Sound good?
Jeff

Answered by Jeff Alworth, Ask Oregon Beer Expert on March 12th, 2012 - Post Your Answer

If I plan to do the coast ride by myself, what would you recommend to prepare for the trip from North – South on Rt. 101?

The Oregon coast is a pretty fantastic stretch of coastline, complete with a ton of off-bike adventures and amenities to make the whole thing enjoyable. Late September/Early October would be a nice time–after the summer rush, but before the weather really starts to get inhospitable to long days of pedaling.

I’ll say right off I had a hard time finding info on a company that just offers gear shuttling for a ride like yours. There are certainly many companies that offer guided, supported trips, but as far as a shuttle service, this was the only one I found. It comes highly recommended.

For lodging, you’ll do best to look at your route first, estimate your daily mileage, and focus your searching on the towns you want to stay in. It’s worth looking at VRBO.com to see if there are some smaller, private rentals that might be available, since that’s always a nice way to go, but can also be impractical for single night stays.

Here are some recommendations for coast lodging, dining, and things to see/do.

From an overall planning point of view, here are a few great links you might find helpful:

Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) Bike Routes (note the link to Oregon Coast Bike Route)

Great Oregon rides around the state (be sure to look at the resource links)

Answered by Otis Rubottom, Ask Oregon Cycling Expert on March 12th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
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