Mt Hood & Columbia Gorge Search Results

1 - 10 of 18   Mt Hood & Columbia Gorge in Oregon
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Where can I find huckleberries around Mt. Hood?

Huckleberries generally grow in the mountains above about 3000 feet. There are some great spots around Mt Hood, and I have even gone over to the Wallowas to pick.

A free permit is required from the Forest Service, even if you are only planning on harvesting a small amount for your personal use. My best advice is to ask the rangers when you stop in the Ranger Station to get your permit. I usually go to the Zig Zag Ranger station to do this. All that is required is a valid photo ID.

Be aware that there are some areas off limits to picking, as they are reserved to Warm Springs tribal members due to treaty rights. These areas are generally well marked. The rangers can also help you with this, and even provide maps.

If you aren’t interested in picking, there is generally a stand in the parking lot next to Charburger in Cascade Locks that sells them during the season. You may also be interested in the Mount Hood Huckleberry Festival.

However, my favorite place to find huckleberries is in one of the famous milkshakes from the Huckleberry Inn in Government Camp.

Happy hunting!!

Can we see Multnomah Falls and the Oneonta Gorge in one day?

You can absolutely visit both the waterfalls and then make the “loop” around the mountain to visit Mt. Hood thanks to extended summer daylight hours, or if you plan on getting an early start.

I would suggest taking I-84 east, then taking the Corbett exit to join the historic highway. While most people start in Troutdale, you really won’t be missing any of the major sights, and this will save you some time if you plan on making the loop around the mountain.

After you reach Corbett, make sure to stop at both Women’s Forum and Vista House/Crown Point. Both spots have incredible panoramic views of the Gorge. Vista House is a beautiful historic building, originally built as a “rest area”, but you will have a hard time believing that after you see it.

From there, you will enter the “waterfall area”. Besides Oneonta Gorge and Multnomah Falls, you will definitely want to stop at Latourell Falls, Wahkeena Falls, and Horsetail Falls. Let me know if you would like me to suggest any hikes in this area. There are some nice, short ones in this area well worth your time.

Shortly after Horsetail Falls, you will rejoin I-84. Continue on to Bonneville Dam. The Fish Hatchery here is well worth a stop to see the HUGE sturgeon, and if you have some extra quarters feed the trout.

From there, return on the freeway east and you can stop either in Cascade Locks for lunch, or continue on to Hood River to eat. It all depends on how hungry you are. There are some great brewpubs in Hood River.

From Hood River, you will travel on Highway 35 around Mt. Hood. This will take you through the heart of the “fruit loop“, filled with orchards, wineries, and other attractions.

You will see some beautiful scenery as you travel around the mountain and then join Highway 26. There are some great places to stop for views of the mountain. Let me know if you would like some specific suggestions on scenic spots.

One definite MUST STOP is Timberline Lodge. The craftsmanship of the place is incredible. It was all hand built during the depression. From there you will travel highway 26 and head back towards Portland.

Let me know if you want any dining suggestions, or have any more questions. I realize this is probably a little information overload, but wanted to make sure I got everything covered for you.

Have fun planning your adventure!

When is the best time of year to visit the Columbia River Gorge?

To be honest, there really isn’t a BAD time to visit the Columbia Gorge. There are a few months in the winter, when ice can be an issue, but even then the waterfalls are beautiful when they are half frozen over.

For wildflowers, the best time to visit is generally in late April through June. April is also peak bloom time for the orchards of the Hood River Valley and around The Dalles.

For the best weather (i.e. least chance of rain) late July through August are always a safe bet.

My favorite time of year in the Gorge is the fall, from about mid-September through the month of October. Most of the summer crowds are gone, the fall foliage puts on a stunning show (consistently one of the best in the US), and the bounty of the harvest is at its peak in the Hood River Valley. The weather is usually still pretty pleasant too.

I’m going to Mt. Hood, want to get to the top of the mountain and want a large variety of ski terrain. Which resort should I visit?

Good day Mitchell!

Thanks for the question. The resort that would most suit you is Mount Hood Meadows. It has everything you are looking for and has the most expert terrain along with the most varied terrain.

When it is clear, the upper lift is all above tree line and has incredible skiing along with beautiful views. The lower has amazing trails and tree skiing of all ability levels. Have an awesome winter and please feel free to send more questions if needed!

All the best,
Asit Rathod

Answered by Asit Rathod, Ask Oregon Snow Sports Expert on December 8th, 2012 - Post Your Answer
,

What are some good indoor rainy day activities in the Mt Hood/Columbia River Gorge area? -Greggory D.

I would recommend checking out the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center/Wasco County History Museum in The Dalles, along with the Fort Dalles museum.

You may also be interested in WAAAM (WAAAM: Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum) in Hood River. Definitely some interesting photographs of the vintage vehicles could be had there.

While not indoors, I would suggest checking out the Mosier Twin Tunnels trail. There are some great vantage points of the Gorge from here, and the tunnels do offer shelter from the rain. Keep an eye out for the historic graffiti left inside by snowbound travelers back when this was the highway.

Is there an apple tour in the Hood River area or around Mt Hood? Where is the best place for fall color?

Are you looking for an organized tour, or one you can drive on yourself?

There are actually Gravenstein apples are actually in season right now, and there are many U-pick farms where you can go and pick your own. For the most variety in apples the best time to go is generally anytime in October. (This is usually when I stock up on my own to make apple butter.) See the Hood River Fruit Loop  for detailed information.

For best fall colors, I suggest a drive along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The combination of waterfalls and autumn foliage is outstanding! This can also be done on your way to Hood River to fetch apples!

What are your suggestions for a two-day trip in Mt Hood and Columbia River Gorge in October?

I would suggest using Hood River as a base for your two days here. Lots of lodging options, brew pubs, wineries and it’s right on the Columbia River. It’s also a great spot for easy access to the recreation areas of Mount Hood and the Gorge. Mount Hood Adventure is a great company to contact for help with planning horseback riding and other adventure activities.

Downtown Troutdale has a few good restaurants, art galleries, and antique shops. The real attraction in Troutdale is McMenamin’s Edgefield. Several restaurants, glass blowers, bars, and the winery. It’s a destination in itself. It was once a poor farm, and they have restored it to a hotel, along with the other things I previously mentioned. You could easily spend a few hours just wandering from bar to bar and touring the grounds.

Is there an alpine slide somewhere around Mt. Hood?

Yes, there is an alpine slide on Mt Hood, located at Ski Bowl East. In addition to the slide, they have 20+ activities available,
including a zip line, bungee jumping, human hamster balls and more. My kids and I were just up there a couple of weeks ago and had a blast!

Enjoy planning your adventure!

We’ll be visiting Oregon in August and driving from Portland to Hood River one day, and then to Bend the next day. What would be the best way to experience Mt. Hood? Is there any way to get to the snow in that period of time?

The best way to experience Mount Hood, especially if you want to get up close to some snow, is to visit Timberline Lodge. You won’t get any closer to the mountain. They do a great lunch buffet, for a very reasonable
price using many local ingredients. Take a ride up on the ski lift to the Palmer Snowfield, where you can play in the snow year round, even in August.

You may also consider making a stop at Trillium Lake on your way to Bend, and not far from Timberline Lodge. Yet another great view of the mountain here, reflected perfectly in the lake if the wind isn’t blowing too
hard.

Enjoy planning your Oregon adventure.

A friend and I are planning a trip to Oregon, by Amtrak from Minnasota. We are both disabled but need no extra equipment for walking. Rugged trails, bicycling, rafting are not options. Yet we want to see the ocean, mountains, great nature… all Oregon has to offer. Any suggestions?

Good news!!! Most of the waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge are very accessible. Many are visible from the highway, or a short walk on a paved trail. A few that immediately come to mind besides the most famous, Multnomah Falls, are Latourell, Wahkeena, Horsetail, and the beautiful tunnel at Oneonta Gorge. Vista House on Crown Point is another must see, and they even have a ramp and elevators if the stairs are a little too much for you (same goes for the lodge at Multnomah Falls).

A visit to Timberline Lodge at Mount Hood is also a must do. Again, easy to maneuver and you literally drive right up to the mountain. Depending on the time of year, you can even ride the chair lift to the top of Palmer Glacier. You can also drive to Trillium Lake, which has a beautiful view of Mount Hood, reflected in the lake, and an pretty flat, easy trail along the east side of the lake if you are so interested.

If you are also planning a trip along the coast, there are some beautiful viewpoints along Highway 101. Cannon Beach and Seaside, the town closes to Portland, also offer some waysides with easy beach access.

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